Police Week: MacDill pays tribute to fallen comrades

Members of the 6th Security Forces Squadron participate in a 24-hour vigilance run to commemorate Police Week at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 22, 2018. Police Week is a national observance that pays tribute to the law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others.

Members of the 6th Security Forces Squadron participate in a 24-hour vigilance run to commemorate Police Week at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 22, 2018. Police Week is a national observance that pays tribute to the law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Caleb Nunez)

A 6th Security Forces Squadron Airman lays down a rose to honor fallen comrades during Police Week at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 22, 2018. MacDill celebrated Police Week with a variety of events to commemorate the contributions and sacrifices of law enforcement officials around the world.

A 6th Security Forces Squadron Airman lays down a rose to honor fallen comrades during Police Week at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 22, 2018. MacDill celebrated Police Week with a variety of events to commemorate the contributions and sacrifices of law enforcement officials around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Caleb Nunez)

An Airmen of the 6th Security Forces Squadron bows his head during a moment of silence in remembrance of fallen law enforcement officers at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 21, 2018. The ceremony was held as part of Police Week, which included other events such as a 24-hour vigilance run and a kickball game.

An Airmen of the 6th Security Forces Squadron bows his head during a moment of silence in remembrance of fallen law enforcement officers at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 21, 2018. The ceremony was held as part of Police Week, which included other events such as a 24-hour vigilance run and a kickball game. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Caleb Nunez)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jeremy Stull, a flight chief assigned to the 6th Security Forces Squadron, runs with a thin blue line flag after a 24-hour vigilance run at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. MacDill celebrated Police Week with a variety of events to commemorate the contributions and sacrifices of law enforcement officials around the world.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jeremy Stull, a flight chief assigned to the 6th Security Forces Squadron, runs with a thin blue line flag after a 24-hour vigilance run at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. MacDill celebrated Police Week with a variety of events to commemorate the contributions and sacrifices of law enforcement officials around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Caleb Nunez)

Members of the 6th Security Forces Squadron participate in a 24-hour vigilance run to commemorate Police Week at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 22, 2018. Police Week is a national observance that pays tribute to the law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others.

Members of the 6th Security Forces Squadron participate in a 24-hour vigilance run to commemorate Police Week at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 22, 2018. Police Week is a national observance that pays tribute to the law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Caleb Nunez)

A member of the 6th Security Forces Squadron prepares to kick a ball during a Battle of the Badges kickball game against the fire department at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 22, 2018. This year’s recognition of Police Week consisted of a variety of events that included a remembrance ceremony, a 24-hour vigilance run and a kickball game.

A member of the 6th Security Forces Squadron prepares to kick a ball during a Battle of the Badges kickball game against the fire department at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., May 22, 2018. This year’s recognition of Police Week consisted of a variety of events that included a remembrance ceremony, a 24-hour vigilance run and a kickball game. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Caleb Nunez)

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

Established by President John F. Kennedy in 1962, Police Week is a national observance that pays tribute to law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others.

To commemorate this observance, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, hosted a variety of events May 21-24, 2018.

The observance began with a remembrance ceremony in which Airmen placed roses on a Fallen Soldier Battle Cross to honor the memory of those who have fallen so that their sacrifice may never be forgotten.

“Police Week gives us a chance to think about the sacrifices our comrades have made in the defense of our freedom,” said Airman 1st Class Austin Arnold, an entry controller assigned to the 6th Security Forces Squadron. “It was a privilege to honor the memory of those who have protected us countryside and overseas.”

After a moment of silence, the remembrance ceremony concluded and a 24-hour vigilance run began. The runners carried a thin blue line flag, which represents courage in the face of insurmountable odds.

“Although running for an hour straight was physically challenging, all I could think of was why I was running and who I was running for,” said Airman 1st Class Allison Coker, an entry controller assigned to the 6th Security Forces Squadron. “The pain didn’t matter when I thought about how others have sacrificed way more.”

Following the vigilance run, the flag was carried over to a softball field, where a Battle of the Badges kickball game was held between law enforcement and the fire department to conclude the events on a high note.

“Sometimes, in our day-to-day, we forget why we do what we do and how important it is,” said Arnold. “Honoring those who gave everything to protect us and our rights, really makes the big picture visible when you’re doing something as small as scanning ID’s at the gate.”