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MacDill celebrates National Hispanic Heritage Month

The poster depicts Staff Sgt. Ladislao “L.C.” Castro, the assistant engineer and waist door .50 caliber gunner on a B-24 Liberator bomber named “T-Bar” of the "Flying Eightballs" in the 506th Squadron, 44th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 8th Air Force. We celebrate him in correlation with National Hispanic Heritage Month, formerly known as Hispanic Heritage Week, has been celebrated for more than 50 years and dates back to 1968. In 1988, during the President Ronald Reagan administration the observance period, that was once only a week extended to a month and received its new name. Since then, National Hispanic Heritage Month begins every 15th of September and ends the 15th of October. During this month members pay respect to the Americans who sacrificed themselves for this nation.

The poster depicts Staff Sgt. Ladislao “L.C.” Castro, the assistant engineer and waist door .50 caliber gunner on a B-24 Liberator bomber named “T-Bar” of the "Flying Eightballs" in the 506th Squadron, 44th Bombardment Group (Heavy), 8th Air Force. We celebrate him in correlation with National Hispanic Heritage Month, formerly known as Hispanic Heritage Week, has been celebrated for more than 50 years and dates back to 1968. In 1988, during the President Ronald Reagan administration the observance period, that was once only a week extended to a month and received its new name. Since then, National Hispanic Heritage Month begins every 15th of September and ends the 15th of October. During this month members pay respect to the Americans who sacrificed themselves for this nation. (Graphic by Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute)

Depicted in the poster is Sergeant Consuelo Mary Hartsell. She left the service in 1946. The sisters were sent to boot camp at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, the only sisters and the only Latinos in the camp. Both were assigned office jobs at the Depot of Supplies of the 1st Marine Division in San Francisco. Hartsell was assigned a desk job overseeing supplies shipped to and from overseas.She was awarded American Campaign and World War II victory medals, as well as recognition for her honorable service.We celebrate her in correlation with National Hispanic Heritage Month, formerly known as Hispanic Heritage Week, has been celebrated for more than 50 years and dates back to 1968. In 1988, during the President Ronald Reagan administration the observance period, that was once only a week extended to a month and received its new name. Since then, National Hispanic Heritage Month begins every 15th of September and ends the 15th of October. During this month members pay respect to the Americans who sacrificed themselves for this nation.

Depicted in the poster is Sergeant Consuelo Mary Hartsell. She left the service in 1946. The sisters were sent to boot camp at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, the only sisters and the only Latinos in the camp. Both were assigned office jobs at the Depot of Supplies of the 1st Marine Division in San Francisco. Hartsell was assigned a desk job overseeing supplies shipped to and from overseas. She was awarded American Campaign and World War II victory medals, as well as recognition for her honorable service.We celebrate her in correlation with National Hispanic Heritage Month, formerly known as Hispanic Heritage Week, has been celebrated for more than 50 years and dates back to 1968. In 1988, during the President Ronald Reagan administration the observance period, that was once only a week extended to a month and received its new name. Since then, National Hispanic Heritage Month begins every 15th of September and ends the 15th of October. During this month members pay respect to the Americans who sacrificed themselves for this nation. (Graphic by Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute)

Depicted in the poster is Corporal Julius Casarez. In June of 1942, Casarez was sent via Africa to India, to serve as part of the 703rd Special Forces, a machine-gun battalion.We recognize him in correlation with National Hispanic Heritage Month, formerly known as Hispanic Heritage Week, has been celebrated for more than 50 years and dates back to 1968. In 1988, during the President Ronald Reagan administration the observance period, that was once only a week extended to a month and received its new name. Since then, National Hispanic Heritage Month begins every 15th of September and ends the 15th of October. During this month members pay respect to the Americans who sacrificed themselves for this nation.

Depicted in the poster is Corporal Julius Casarez. In June of 1942, Casarez was sent via Africa to India, to serve as part of the 703rd Special Forces, a machine-gun battalion.We recognize him in correlation with National Hispanic Heritage Month, formerly known as Hispanic Heritage Week, has been celebrated for more than 50 years and dates back to 1968. In 1988, during the President Ronald Reagan administration the observance period, that was once only a week extended to a month and received its new name. Since then, National Hispanic Heritage Month begins every 15th of September and ends the 15th of October. During this month members pay respect to the Americans who sacrificed themselves for this nation. (Graphic by Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute)

From Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, MacDill AFB will observe and celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, a time when the contribution of Hispanic Americans who have served and are serving now are recognized.
The observance started in 1968 under President Lyndon Johnson's administration as a one-week celebration called Hispanic Heritage Week. Years later, President Ronald Reagan proposed extending this celebration into a month-long event. It was enacted into law on Aug. 17, 1988, officially designating the 30-day period starting on Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 as National Hispanic Heritage Month. This year’s theme is “Honoring the Past, Securing the Future!” Hispanics and Hispanic-Americans make contributions in many fields that enable the greatness of America. Their contributions to the defense of this nation, the arts, sports, public service, research and development, non-profit organization management, civil rights, politics, business, agriculture, and the service industry enable America to maintain its competitiveness, relevance, and position in the global landscape as the leader of the free world.

From Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, MacDill AFB will observe and celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, a time when the contribution of Hispanic Americans who have served and are serving now are recognized. The observance started in 1968 under President Lyndon Johnson's administration as a one-week celebration called Hispanic Heritage Week. Years later, President Ronald Reagan proposed extending this celebration into a month-long event. It was enacted into law on Aug. 17, 1988, officially designating the 30-day period starting on Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 as National Hispanic Heritage Month. This year’s theme is “Honoring the Past, Securing the Future!” Hispanics and Hispanic-Americans make contributions in many fields that enable the greatness of America. Their contributions to the defense of this nation, the arts, sports, public service, research and development, non-profit organization management, civil rights, politics, business, agriculture, and the service industry enable America to maintain its competitiveness, relevance, and position in the global landscape as the leader of the free world. (Graphic by Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute)

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

From Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, MacDill AFB will observe and celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, a time when the contribution of Hispanic Americans who have served and are serving now are recognized.

The observance started in 1968 under President Lyndon Johnson's administration as a one-week celebration called Hispanic Heritage Week. Years later, President Ronald Reagan proposed extending this celebration into a month-long event. It was enacted into law on Aug. 17, 1988, officially designating the 30-day period starting on Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 as National Hispanic Heritage Month.

This year’s theme is “Honoring the Past, Securing the Future!” Hispanics and Hispanic-Americans make contributions in many fields that enable the greatness of America. Their contributions to the defense of this nation, the arts, sports, public service, research and development, non-profit organization management, civil rights, politics, business, agriculture, and the service industry enable America to maintain its competitiveness, relevance, and position in the global landscape as the leader of the free world.

Hispanic Americans played an immeasurable role in the United States’ Armed Forces during World War II by serving bravely and with distinction from the initial attack on Pearl Harbor to the last days of the Pacific campaign.

Sixty men of Hispanic heritage have been awarded the Medal of Honor. The award comes through the National Defense Authorization Act, which called for a review of Jewish American and Hispanic American veterans from World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War to ensure that no prejudice was shown to those deserving the medal.

It is the highest military decoration presented by the United States government to a member of its Armed Forces. Of the sixty Medals of Honor, two were presented to members of the United States Navy, thirteen to members of the United States Marine Corps and forty-six to members of the United States Army. Forty-two of the Medals of Honor were presented posthumously.

The nation remains forever indebted to WWII veterans, who not only forever changed the course of history, but who demonstrated selfless service and sacrifice in defense of global peace and security.

We remember the legacy of the “Greatest Generation” by Honoring the Past, Securing the Future.