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MacDill team keeps flightline, skies clear for take off

The quiet flightline on a Monday morning at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Oct. 1, 2018.

MacDill's flightline sits silently on Monday morning, Oct. 1, 2018, bare but ready for aircraft to lay foot on its perfectly maintained strip of pavement. The 6th Operation Support Squadron works around the clock to ensure the air space and runway safely catches or launches any aircraft, any time. (U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Sean Holly, an airfield manager assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, checks his desk computer at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Sept. 28, 2018.

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Sean Holly, an airfield manager assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, checks operations status at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Sept. 28, 2018. MacDill’s Airfield Management team works 12-hour shifts to maintain and monitor all flightline activity. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Sean Holly, an airfield manager assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, drives at truck on the flightline at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Sept. 28, 2018.

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Sean Holly, an airfield manager assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, drives a truck on the MacDill Air Force Base flightline, Sept. 28, 2018. Holly inspects the approach light system daily to ensure pilots have a clear landing path. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Sean Holly, an airfield manager assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, checks the approach light system at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Sept. 28, 2018.

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Sean Holly, an airfield manager assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, checks the approach light system at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Sept. 28, 2018. Holly and other members of the Airfield Management team must inspect the lights every day to ensure there is a clear path to guide pilots onto the runway. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Daryl Rivera-Rivera, air traffic control journeyman assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, and Airman 1st Class Julian Hurrey, air traffic control apprentice assigned to the 6th OSS, examine the flightline at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Oct. 1, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Daryl Rivera-Rivera, air traffic control journeyman assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, and Airman 1st Class Julian Hurrey, air traffic control apprentice, examine the flightline at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Oct. 1, 2018. Controllers like Hurrey spend up to 18 months in training before they can conduct flight operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Julian Hurrey, air traffic control apprentice assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, views operations from the air traffic control tower on MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Oct. 1, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Julian Hurrey, air traffic control apprentice assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, views operations from the air traffic control tower at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Oct. 1, 2018. Hurrey detailed the importance of collaboration between air and ground to ensure safe and proper procedures for arriving and departing aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)

U.S Air Force Senior Airman Daryl Rivera-Rivera, air traffic control journeyman assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, watches the air traffic control tower simulator on MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Oct. 1, 2018.

U.S Air Force Senior Airman Daryl Rivera-Rivera, air traffic control journeyman assigned to the 6th Operation Support Squadron, watches the air traffic control tower simulator on MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Oct. 1, 2018. The tower simulator allows the air traffic control team to train and practice for various scenarios they may encounter in real world operations. (U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --
Collaboration from above and below within the 6th Operation Support Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, ensures all Total Force aircraft can take off or land at any moment. Airfield Management and Air Traffic Control teams keep MacDill’s flightline clear and safe -- together they are always ready, always on watch. (U.S. Air Force photo story by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)